2020-too much? What Canadian Kids Think of the New Year | Item

Some kids say this year feels like a repeat of 2020


⭐️ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ⭐️

  • Some kids say 2022 feels like 2020 all over again.

  • CBC Kids News reached out to four young Canadians to find out how they are feeling.

  • They talked about going back to school online and tips for staying positive.

  • Read on to find out what gives them hope. ⬇️ ⬇️ ⬇️


16-year-old Hudson Thomas was hoping to celebrate the New Year with his friends.

Instead, he stayed home with his family in Sarnia, Ontario.

With pandemic restrictions reimposed across the country, Hudson told CBC Kids News that this year is very much like last — and the year before that.

He is not alone.

You may have noticed the internet memes describing this year as “2020 too”. Find? It’s like 2020 again.

Hudson was looking forward to leaving the pandemic behind in 2022, but like many kids in Canada, he is concerned about the Omicron variant and the recent surge in COVID-19 infections.

CBC Kids News reached out to Canadian kids to get their thoughts on the year ahead.

CBC Kids News asked Canadian kids to share a few words to describe how they feel about 2022. Here are some of their responses. (Graphic design by Philip Street/CBC)

Back to virtual learning

Like many kids across Canada, Hudson had to transition to virtual learning after the holidays.

As an 11th grader, he spent almost half his time in high school learning online.

It was difficult for him because he prefers to learn in person.

“I learn much better in person, where I can ask my teacher questions and collaborate with my classmates,” he said.

Hudson Thomas is hopeful for the new year, but he wonders when life will get back to

Hudson Thomas is hopeful for the new year, but he wonders when life will get back to “normal”. (Image submitted by Hudson Thomas)

Hudson said he looks forward to returning to school in person on Jan. 17, along with other Ontario students.

How to stay positive?

Everly Barker, 11, from Burnaby, B.C., said her approach to staying positive in 2022 is to look into new hobbies.

“Try something new, something you’ve never tried before,” she said.

Painting in watercolors is something she has enjoyed since the pandemic began.

Everly said it’s important to have something you enjoy doing when you’re bored or upset.

Hudson Thomas is hopeful for the new year, but he wonders when life will get back to

Everly Barker loves her new hobby, watercolor painting, and hopes to do more in 2022. (Image submitted by Brandee Barker)

Gina Soth, 15, from London, Ont., said they’re counting on old hobbies like reading and playing the piano to help keep them busy in 2022.

Everly and Gina also recommend staying in touch with friends to stay positive.

How do you stay in touch with your friends?

Sure, it can be difficult to stay in touch with friends during the pandemic, Gina said, but it’s worth the effort.

“I think it’s important to have a supportive buddy and look out for each other. We’ve all been through this before,” they said.

Gina enjoys playing games through Dovecote, an app that lets you play games like archery, golf, and chess against your friends.

Gina Soth can't wait to get back to school in person.  In the meantime, the 15-year-old uses mobile games to keep in touch with his friends.  (Image submitted by Gina Soth)

Gina Soth can’t wait to get back to school in person. In the meantime, the 15-year-old uses mobile games to keep in touch with his friends. (Image submitted by Gina Soth)

Eric Elton, 9, from Kelowna, British Columbia, said video games also help him stay in touch with his friends.

“Do what makes you happiest,” he said.

For Eric, the game allows him to stay connected during a time when he is encouraged to stay home.

Eric Elton enjoys playing video games as a fun way to keep in touch with his friends.  (Image submitted by Penny Elton)

Eric Elton enjoys playing video games as a fun way to keep in touch with his friends. (Image submitted by Penny Elton)

Lessons learned during the pandemic

Looking back on the past two years, Gina said she’s hopeful the ongoing pandemic will leave us with some lessons learned.

Even if it’s something as simple as good hygiene, they said, like washing hands and cleaning surfaces regularly.

Or more complex things like mental health support, paid sick leave, and government policies that support students.

“Sometimes the best in humanity comes out in the worst times,” Gina said.

What do you hope for?

Everly, who was able to get her first COVID-19 shot on Dec. 3, said she was looking forward to getting her second shot.

She said she hopes it will allow her to do more things and see more people in 2022.

As for Hudson, he just hopes the start of 2022 means we’re getting closer to the end of the pandemic.

“We are all humans and we are all affected by this virus. We all want this pandemic to be over,” he said.


TOP IMAGE CREDIT: Images submitted by Penny Elton, Gina Soth, Brandee Barker and Hudson Thomas, graphic design by Philip Street/CBC